Sunday, November 13, 2016

Guido Pullover



Finally finished the sweater I started for Jeff this summer, and we're both pretty happy about it. In my early knitting days, I made a few sweaters for Jeff. When I proposed making them, he happily said yes, but then rarely wore the resulting garments. He instinctively knew that I'm a process knitter and that the journey is way more important to me than the result. He knew I'd be happy making them. But he just doesn't care to wear wool that much, and our Texas climate doesn't provide that many opportunities to wear it comfortably. So I'd stopped making sweaters for him.


Then, as I started watching the Fruity Knitting podcast, Jeff admired a smart striped pullover that Andrew wears in some of the episodes. When we got to meet Andrea and Andrew this summer, I asked her about it, and she pointed me toward the pattern and yarn. Rowan Purelife Revive is (or was) composed of roughly 1/3 each recycled cotton, silk and viscose(rayon) -- much more wearable for a Texas winter -- or a German spring! Though discontinued, I managed to scrape up enough yarn from various online vendors in the right colors and got a copy of the Rowan magazine (#55) with the pattern.

I went through several mood swings with this pattern and yarn. It has no "give" to it, so it's kind of like knitting with kite string. Knitting for long periods could be a bit rough on the hands. And I mistakenly looked at an errata page and ordered one less ball of the main whitish color than I needed for the 42" size and ended up having to order that extra ball later. Fortunately, the supplier still had the same dye lot. Some parts of this I just flew through -- one of the sleeves was done in just a few days -- while others took ages. One factor for the time it took was this project's non-portability. All those different colors to wrangle and all the careful counting and slipping that had to happen.

Seaming it all up was also difficult for me. The slipped and therefore wrapped stitches on the edge made it difficult to see where to run the yearn for the seams. On the sleeves especially, the edge stitches switched from wrapped slipped edges to stockinette edges and I got confused. I tried doing a backstitch from the wrong side, but I really don't have enough experience with that and wasn't pleased with the results, although I did use it for the shoulders. I managed with mattress stitch seaming on the right side for the rest. The seams are fairly obvious, but I don't think that's a problem with this particular garment. At the point where the collar starts, the instructions say to use the color that's right in the center of the front. But in consultation with Jeff, we agreed that the ribbed collar should match the ribbing on the hips and the cuffs. I think that was a good call.

Jeff likes it and it looks really good on him. And the cotton/silk/rayon blend means it will be wearable for a longer part of the fall and winter. Especially happy that I got this done before the coolest part of the year hits. Notice I didn't say "coldest". Not sure that term applies anymore. Anyway, I like the striping, and that I branched out into colors I wouldn't normally choose. I think it has a bit of an 80's retro vibe to it. It fits me, too. Just sayin'....

On the same day, I funneled my just-completed-a-project adrenaline into some socks I'd had on the needles for OVER A YEAR! I just wanted them done. I'm not usually opposed to fraternal twin socks with this kind of yarn, but this pair, which I dubbed the Domino Socks, just aren't doing it for me. I liked the yarn when I bought it, and loved the shop in Maryland run by two Mennonite sisters where I bought it. I remember casting on for these using my plain go-to sock recipe just to have a portable project for some event, then never really took it out of the house much again after that. But they're done and I won't have to stare at that the WIP label under it in Ravelry any more. I did enjoy the solid black toes and afterthought heels, though.

Maybe I can cast on for some socks that actually interest me soon. I also have an interesting scarf coming up and beautiful yarn for a Fair Isle hat. If you're still here, stay tuned!

 






9 comments:

  1. I think the sweater looks fantastic - and very wearable in your climate. I hope Jeff loves it!

    When I knit sweaters that are worked in pieces that will need to be seamed, I have started making sure edges have at least 1-2 stockinette stitches. It makes SUCH a big difference when you get to the mattress stitch. I've done it both ways and now I modify on the fly!

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  2. Good idea! Clarification question: If you add two stitches on either side, do you then make the body four stitches narrower so that the piece's width matches what the pattern says it should be?

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  3. I have this same yarn and pattern set aside in my stash. I love the way your sweater turned out!

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    1. Thanks! If you've got the yarn, you should definitely make it -- its getting harder and harder to find!

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  4. Do you think this would look good on a wonam? I am thinking of knitting the smallest size for myself

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    1. I'm not sure! I haven't made any garments with torso shaping around the hips or bust, if that's part of your planning, so I couldn't really say. But I imagine doing so with stripes might create some challenges. I didn't say any examples of women wearing this design in any of the samples in Ravelry. I can also say that being a cotton/silk/rayon blend, the drape is rather heavy, so keep that in mind.

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    2. Thanks. I was not going to put any shaping in -just knit it as is and wear it as an oversized pullover!

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    3. Then go for it! Just remembered -- the sleeves are a little on the long-ish side, so keep that in mind.

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    4. Thanks! I will shorten the sleeves if needs be.....I can compare with another sweater as I go.

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