Sunday, March 25, 2007

Where to Begin?


I should have photographed these sticking out from the edge of my house's foundation. I'm afraid they're starting to look like something the Wicked Witch of the East might have worn.

I took this picture in our backyard, which, due to extreme effort on my part, is way less jungly than it was at the start of the weekend. I seriously considered re-zoning some of the weeds as hedges, but thought better of it. It was crazy overgrown back there. It still is in patches, but at least the bits of lawn have been reclaimed. The roses are starting their spring blooming period and the yard smells quite nice -- if you ignore the organic turkey poop fertilizer I just put on the grass.

I hope I can walk tomorrow.

Yesterday I mentioned that this heel has a French heel and that it was all mysterious, with the stitches for the heel divided between two needles. I don't know what I was thinking, but socks knit on DPNs usually do have the stitches divided between two needles. I've just re-read some of the front matter in Nancy Bush's book, and realize that just about every heel I've ever knit has been a French heel -- as opposed to Dutch, German or Welsh. So, no reason to panic. There is one odd thing about the heel...

Rather than the beginning of the gusset round starting at the middle of the heel (where the two needles cross at the top of the heel) and moving onto the right gusset, this pattern calls for the gusset decrease rounds to begin at the beginning of the left heel flap (where you can see the working yarn trailing off in the picture). The only reason I can see to do this is because one can -- the heel has just been turned in the contrasting color, and since the pattern calls to start working with the main color, why not start wherever you want to?

The main problem I'm going to have is remembering to do the left slanting decrease (Sl1, K1, PSSO) first in the round, and the right-slanting decrease (K2T), second.

4 comments:

  1. That sock is a little bright, isn't it? But in a good way! And I have to say that I think your back yard looks great. Mine is weeds and bare spots!

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  2. I LOVE the color of the yarn!! I'm still figuring out the sock thing myself so all those technical terms made me break out in a sweat. I'm sure I'll figure it out one of these days!

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  3. I've eyed this pattern in the Vintage Socks book, as well - but I don't have 2 solid yarns of the same type in my stash (not being much of a solid yarn gal). Maybe that means I need to buy more yarn!!!

    Are you enjoying KnitPicks Essential? I have some in stash in a nice denim blue.

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  4. Janna -- that was a VERY strategically posed sock. I've got plenty of weeds and bare spots. And it is a bit bright. I'm thinking if I can't take it, I'll give the pair to my UT grad brother-in-law!

    Amy -- just give it a try. My first sock freaked me out beyond belief, but they actually kind of make sense once you get started. You probably have all the skills to make one already -- its just putting them all together in a different way.

    And finally, Janelle -- of course you need to buy more yarn. For your lovely stash case! The Essential is very fine -- it could probably be knit on 00 needles comfortably, if I had some. It does have strange fuzzies that come off of it in places -- a little more rustic than smooth.

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